Building a Unique Chicken Coop | Living the Country Life
More
Close

Building a Unique Chicken Coop

Mike Webster only had two requirements for his chicken coop. It had to be one of a kind, and it had to be repurposed.
  • The old frame of Webster's coop came from an Ontario Grain Drill.
    Photo courtesy of Mike Webster

    The Base

    The base for Webster's coop is the frame of an early '60s Ontario Grain Drill. The Webster's 8-acre home in Hookstown, Pennsylvania, borders two 100-acre farms.

    "For years I’ve passed it on the edge of the neighbor’s field when I went hunting," Webster says. "Finally I asked the neighbor if I could buy it."

    When Webster told the farmer that it was for a chicken coop, he gladly handed over the rusty frame. After a lot of welding, grinding, and cutting, Webster had a solid base for his new-to-him chicken coop.

    Date Published: April 25, 2016
    Date Updated: April 25, 2016
    Tags: Coops
  • The coop in progress.
    Photo courtesy of Mike Webster

    Repurposing More

    Aside from the grain drill base, Webster managed to repurpose a whole slew of items as materials for his coop: 

    1. Redwood decking for the floor.

    2. Oriented Strand Board (OSB) from an old roof for the outer walls.

    3. Paneling from his parents remodel.

    4. A walnut bookcase from a garage sale is now the nesting boxes.

    5. Two inch foam insulation for the floors, roof, and walls came from his friend who just finished building a house.

    6. Roosting bars are from Locust trees he cut.

    7. The door and window came from Construction Junction, a non-profit that sells used building supplies.

    Date Published: April 25, 2016
    Date Updated: April 25, 2016
    Tags: Coops
  • Photo courtesy of Mike Webster

    Costs

    Even though most of the coop was repurposed, Webster still had to buy a few things. The coop cost about $1,500 in total. Webster bought new tin for the roof, new T1-11 plywood, and the trim and fascia to give his coop a rustic look. He also bought a solar-powered automatic door from Pullet Shut, which he says was a great investment.

    Date Published: April 25, 2016
    Date Updated: April 25, 2016
    Tags: Coops
  • The finished coop.
    Photo courtesy of Mike Webster

    The Final Coop

    Webster painted the grain drill frame and coop after they were finished. He says it's been an awesome home for their 13 chickens. The Webster's plan to get more animals in the future, but chickens were the first venture with their children. In the future, the hogs, goats, sheep, or whatever animal finds its way to the Webster's may be jealous of the chickens' beautiful home.
     

    Date Published: April 25, 2016
    Date Updated: April 25, 2016
    Tags: Coops

Latest Blogs

Betsy's Backyard |
5/25/18 | 11:05 AM
My daughter, Caroline, said she missed my blog, so I'm going to download a few ...read more
Betsy's Backyard |
3/12/18 | 1:18 PM
The Living the Country Life Spring/Summer 2018 issue comes out this month. I loved the...read more

Add Your Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login