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Fainting Goats

Learn about fainting goats, and how a family in New Virginia, Iowa, created their own fainting goat farm!
  • Hanna's Upside Down Fainting Goats
    Hanna's Upside Down Fainting Goats

    Hanna's Upside Down Fainting Goats

    In 2006, Tahra and Don Bedwell bought a small fainting goat as a pet for their young daughter, Hanna.

    That one fainting goat turned into Hanna's Upside Down Fainting Goats, a 10-acre farm which consists of 30 fainting goats year-round, and kids (baby goats) in the early spring and late fall.

    Date Published: May 6, 2014
    Date Updated: May 6, 2014
  • Fainting goats have myotonia congenita which causes their muscles to tense, and them to faint.
    Hanna's Upside Down Fainting Goats

    Myotonic condition

    The Bedwell's raise Myotonic goats, or fainting goats as they are most commonly known.

    The name "Myotonic" comes from their genetic condition, myotonia congenita, which is a condition that affects their skeletal muscles.

    This condition causes the muscles to stiffen or tense up. When a fainting, or Myotonic, goat is startled, its mucles will lock up, and it will faint for a mere 10 seconds.

    Watch a video about fainting goats.

     

    Date Published: May 6, 2014
    Date Updated: May 6, 2014
  • Hanna is 10 years old and a member of the Myotonic Goat Registry and 4-H.
    Hanna's Upside Down Fainting Goats

    Hanna's involvement

    Soon after Tahra and Don's daughter, Hanna, received her first goat at the age of two, she became very involved in caring for the animals.

    Today, at 10 years old, Hanna loves to show her goats, and is a member of the Myotonic Goat Registry and 4-H.

    Learn more about the Myotonic Goat Registry.

    Date Published: May 6, 2014
    Date Updated: May 6, 2014
  • Keifer also loves to help on the farm
    Hanna's Upside Down Fainting Goats

    Family affair

    Tahra and Don's three-year-old son, Keifer, also loves to play and help with the goats. 

    Date Published: May 6, 2014
    Date Updated: May 6, 2014
  • Most of the nannies are bred to have kids in the spring
    Hanna's Upside Down Fainting Goats

    Kids for sale (goats)

    Most of the nannies are bred to have kids in the spring, and the farm typically has kids for sale during the last part of March. 

    In Spring 2014, the farm sold about 50 kids. "We usually sell them within days," said Tahra Bedwell. 

    The farm usually has more kids for sale in October.

     

     

    Date Published: May 6, 2014
    Date Updated: May 6, 2014
  • Goats are ideal for small farms and acreages.
    Hanna's Upside Down Fainting Goats

    Why goats?

    Tahra believes goats are ideal for acreages and small farms because they are easy keepers, and they don't take up a lot of space.

    "Goats are also a lot of fun for children to play with!" said Tahra.

    Date Published: May 6, 2014
    Date Updated: May 6, 2014
  • For more information you can visit their website and Facebook page
    Hanna's Upside Down Fainting Goats

    Contact information

    For more information and photos, you can visit the farm's website and Facebook page listed below.

    Website: http://hannasfaintinggoats.weebly.com

    Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/hannasupsidedowngoats

     

     

    Date Published: May 6, 2014
    Date Updated: May 6, 2014

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