Chicken Coop de Ville | Living the Country Life
More
Close

Chicken Coop de Ville

Keala Timko and her sister Coleen designed and constructed a beautiful "Coop de Ville" with features including a scenic country mural and a porch to enjoy the barnyard. Check out these photos to see how it was built!
  • No coop?

    One harsh spring, Keala Timko, left, and her sister Coleen purchased 40 chicks. They had no coop, so they housed the chicks temporarily in their parents' garage. After discovering that coops cost $3,500 to $5,000, the sisters decided to build their own.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: January 17, 2013
  • Floorplan of the coop

    The sisters initially drew up a design of an 8-ft x 8-ft coop. However, their father, who had helped raise 500 chickens when he was younger, convinced them they needed a larger coop. The size was then increased to 15x15. "We first identified the needs of our flock and then added our desires - the fun stuff," Keala said.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: January 17, 2013
  • Coop construction begins

    The sisters, along with the help of their family, began construction as soon as the weather warmed up. Here, the walls of the coop are constructed inside the barn.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: January 17, 2013
  • Location prep for the coop

    Meanwhile, the footings, plumbing, and electrical trenches were prepared where the coop would be located.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: January 17, 2013
  • The coop walls are up

    Here, the walls have been erected on the concrete foundation. The family did the pouring, consolidating, and leveling of the concrete themselves, but they found it to be hard work for amateurs. For all future flatwork projects, they plan to hire a company to do the concrete work.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: January 17, 2013
  • Exterior finishing

    After the framework was up, exterior sheathing was added to the structure followed by shingles. The temperature was over 100 degrees the day the shingles were placed, causing the soles of Keala's shoes to melt off!

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: January 17, 2013
  • Exterior siding

    The siding was then added to the coop as well as a porch, both of which helped the building fit in with the look of the farm. "My sister wanted the coop to blend with her house and barn, and she really wanted a porch where she could sit and enjoy the expanding barnyard," Keala said.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: January 17, 2013
  • Chicken art

    The interior of the coop was given a scenic rural design. The sky was created by mixing a bold blue color and white pain. Leftover yellow paint from another project mixed with the blue created a green color that was perfect for foliage. The chickens' entrance to the coop became a bright red barn. "Two hours later we had a masterpiece mural on the interior," Keala said.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: January 17, 2013
  • Ready for occupancy

    The structure of the coop was complete. All that was left was to give the building some finishing touches. "The door was opened as the sun was setting," Keala said. "The girls quickly made themselves at home."

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: January 17, 2013
  • First night in the coop

    The sisters' chickens admire the scenery, enjoying their first night in the coop.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: January 17, 2013
  • The finished Coop de Ville

    The finished Coop de Ville, as the sisters call it, in all its glory, complete with lights, shutters, porch decorations, and a front door. The total cost of the project was $4,869.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: January 17, 2013
  • FREE Chicken Reference Guide

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Download this FREE Keeping Chickens Guide PDF courtesy of Living the Country Life. Whatever reason you raise chickens for, one thing's for sure: living in the country is simply better with chickens in it.

     

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: January 17, 2013
  • Living the Country Life Magazine

    Date Published:
    Date Updated:
    Tags:

Latest Blogs

Betsy's Backyard |
6/19/15 | 2:34 PM
I planted a pollinator garden this spring and it's doing okay. It's weedy, but...read more
Betsy's Backyard |
6/15/15 | 1:48 PM
Bob and I hosted the Meredith Agrimedia staff -- Successful Farming, Agriculture.com,...read more

Add Your Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login

Loading comments...