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Poultry plus

Chickens are very popular among acreage owners, but they aren't your only choice when it comes to raising poultry. Give these birds a try!
  • Lucky ducks

    Ducks are raised primarily for meat, but they can also be used for their eggs, and as fun pets. Pekin, Rouen and Muscovy are popular breeds. Smaller, ornamental bantam breeds like Calls, Indias, Wood Ducks, and Mandarins are also fun to raise as a hobby. They look great next to the pond and can be entered in shows.

    Learn more:
    Choosing a backyard duck breed

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 1, 2012
  • What's good for the goose ...

    Geese are raised in practically all parts of the U.S., and around the world. Their large eggs go a long way at the breakfast table, and they can also be marketed as breeding stock or sold for their meat when they are 10 to 13 weeks old. Geese also eat insects in the grass, and can be good watchdogs!

    Learn more:
    Choosing a backyard goose breed

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 1, 2012
  • Turkey time

    Raising heritage turkeys is a growing trend among acreage owners. These old-fashioned birds mature slower and are healthier than industrial turkeys.
    Meet a Washington family and their flock of Unimproved Standard Bronze and Wishard turkeys, and see how they practice sustainable agriculture.

    Raising heritage turkeys

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 1, 2012
  • Get some Guineas!

    Guinea fowl are beautiful and entertaining creatures. They eat insects from the yard and garden, including Japanese beetles and ticks. As guineas graze, they also eat weed seeds. They are available in a rainbow of colors and do well with chickens.

    Learn more:
    Get some guineas

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 1, 2012
  • Phantastic pheasants

    Pheasants are well-known wild game birds, but they can also be raised domestically. Even if they're born and raised on your acreage, though, these birds retain some wild tendencies, and need their space to be happy.

    Learn more:
    Raising pheasants

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 1, 2012
  • Give quail a try

    Quail are another wild game bird that can be raised on an acreage. There are several different breeds available, and they can be raised for eggs, meat, breeders, or just for fun.
    If you want to enjoy quail on your property rather than raise them domestically, check this out:

    Establishing wildlife food plots

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 1, 2012
  • Emu opportunity

    Emus grow to be 6 feet tall and 150 pounds, so raising them isn't for the faint of heart. With a 9-foot stride and the ability to run 40 miles per our, they need a long stretch of fenced-in area to run. Emus aren't the most beautiful birds on Earth, but if you're looking for a good marketing opportunity, they may be for you.

    Learn more:
    Raising emus

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 1, 2012
  • King of the birds

    Ostriches may not be the brightest animals on the acreage, but for some farmers, the largest birds on the planet are a profitable addition to their operation. Demand for their meat has risen drastically in recent years, and their leather and eggs can also be sold. Males can become aggressive, however, so it's important to do your research before adding ostriches to your acreage.

    Meet the Applebaum brothers, who raise ostriches on their place in New Jersey:
    Big birds

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 1, 2012
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