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Betsy's Backyard Blog

Betsy Freese is an Executive Editor for Meredith Agrimedia, including Living the Country Life and Successful Farming. She grew up on a fruit farm in Maryland (see www.strawberryfarm.com) and has an agricultural journalism degree from Iowa State University. She and her husband, Bob, a veterinarian, live on a farm in Iowa where they raise sheep, hay, corn, and soybeans.

Email: betsy.freese@meredith.com

Twitter: betsyfreese

December 1, 2016

Bird's-Eye View

Drones are a wonderful technology for seeing your property. These drone photos (thanks to David Ekstrom at our sister publication Successful Farming) show the vast amount of water already backing up into our wetlands. 

Half of my family's 400-acre farm is enrolled in the USDA Conservation Reserve Program for the next 10 years. We haven't done any dirt work on berms yet, but beavers built a dam in the ditch and have backed up water in the wetlands. Here are before and after photos to compare the property in July and on November 30.

This is looking south. The area to the south of the east-west ditch will be wetlands in 2017. 

The beaver dam is on the left.

This is looking north. The field flooding north of the ditch is not all in the wetlands area, unfortunately.

 

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November 17, 2016

Wetlands Project: Busy as Beavers

Our family enrolled the most flood-prone 200 acres of our farm in the Wetland Restoration part of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). The project runs for 10 years. Work has begun to turn this area, which long ago was a natural wetlands before farmers settled the area, into a wetlands once again. The program allows us to seed native grasses and forbs until the ground is frozen this winter and up until July 1, 2017. It may take that long to find a dry spell in this naturally soggy area. The problem with doing any work on a wetlands is obvious – it’s often too wet to get in there. 

Some of the corn could not be harvested because the area is already too wet, thanks to a beaver family that built a dam on our property line. It's almost like they heard about our plans and said, "Let us do the work for you." 

This corn may not get harvested.

You can see the beaver dam in the middle of this photo. Water in the ditch has backed up into the field on both sides. We plan to leave the dam alone this winter.

The field from another angle, as it's being harvested. The combine in this photo is heading toward the beaver dam, which is on the east side of our property line.

The beavers are helping us remove scrub trees. We really need to put a trail camera on these guys.

This is why the deer are so fat in Iowa! The combine misses quite a bit. 

 

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November 10, 2016

Influencers Dinner

Saturday night I was honored to be a guest at an Influencers Dinner in New York City. The Influencers Dinner is a secret dining experience started in 2009 by behavior expert and social engineer Jon Levy. Twelve thought leaders, tastemakers, and influencers from various industries attend each dinner.

During the course of the experience they are not allowed to discuss their professional career or share their last name. The dinner has a community design where Jon guides all attendees through the preparation of the meal. Once seated and eating, guests take turns guessing what their fellow attendees do professionally.

The attendees at my meal included the CEOs of tech companies, writers, comedians, TV news anchors, doctors, and more. After dinner, additional guests, including Jenna Wolfe and Stephanie Gosk, joined us for networking, conversation, and a few presentations (one from comedian and TV producer, Larry Wilmore).

You can read about the dinner in the New York Times and Business Insider.

I was in charge of preparing and cooking the meat for the meal. My first helper was Pat Kiernan, morning anchor for NY1 News.

My second helper was Tim Hwang, founder and CEO of FiscalNote.

Our host, Jon Levy, is at the head of the table. Comedian and writer/producer Larry Wilmore is across from me. 

After dinner, more guests arrived to discuss issues ranging from health, food, art, and relationships. Jon told us all about his new book.

It was a fascinating experience!

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    October 31, 2016

    Autumn red and green

    That day of the year when your trees match your barn.

    The lawn has been green for so long this year, Bob had to upgrade his mower.

    Raccoons have invaded our barn, so Bob set a live trap. Gotcha.

    We took Mr. Coon to our corn farm and let him out in this field. 

    We've had a frost or two, so Bob let the ewes into the alfalfa.

    I'm getting my favorite room in the house, the cozy library, ready for winter projects (or just winter reading).

     

     

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    October 25, 2016

    Glorious Fall

    What a beautiful fall. We mowed off the garden last weekend and found a watermelon hiding under the raspberry bush. That was a surprise! I took the last of the tomatoes and peppers to the kitchen and made salsa. The kale just keeps going after a light frost, so we left it -- along with the fall crop of cilantro. Bob mowed it off last month and the herb came back strong. We also found several butternut squash in the weeds. Once he mowed the garden, I saw the tips of sweet potatoes I had missed earlier, and dug those. I really have a weird garden. 

    We took five lambs to the locker for processing. Our local locker closed this summer, so we had to drive an hour away. We also took a load of 22 lambs to the livestock auction. Prices are down.

    Bob has been busy washing all the farm equipment and driving it to the machine shed for winter storage. He considered trying to make a fifth cutting of alfalfa, but came to his senses.

    At the livestock auction, these pigs sold for $24 each. That is cheap pork. Bob wishes he had bought five or six to feed this fall. Corn is cheap, too.

    Caroline spent extended time this fall with my parents on their farm in Maryland. What a blessing.

     

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    September 30, 2016

    Fall beauty

    Fall skies are the most beautiful. The sunsets are baby blue and gold, while the afternoon skies are brilliant blue.

    Don't try this at home. Bob is fixing a leaking roof without using a safety harness. 

    Two days after his roof work, he was sipping tea on the East Coast with Caroline. We made a trip east to visit my parents.

    Dad plants strawberries on black plastic in August and picks the blossoms (in this case, berries) in September so the plants put energy into foliage. Next spring will be the big berry crop.

    Enjoying steamed blue crabs from the Chesapeake Bay. 

    My sister, Molly, right, shows Dad, left, Uncle Doug, and Aunt Jane photos on her iPad. The tablet is a great invention for sharing photos when you are traveling.

    Mom and Caroline. One of the most precious things in life is spending time with grandparents.

    Back home in Iowa, our ewes enjoy another beautiful sunset. 

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    September 8, 2016

    It's Huge!

    This is not a naked mole rat, as my niece suggested, but just one of the many huge sweet potatoes I harvested this week.

    Bob finally made a fourth cutting of alfalfa. It was ready a month ago, but August was too wet.

    Warren loaded the elevator.

    Bob was waiting in the hot hayloft.

    Here comes another load.

    My late summer flowers.

    Mickey is sniffing around the old root cellar. We need a new door to keep out snakes and varmints. I have potatoes to store down there, but am afraid to open the door.

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    August 31, 2016

    Farm to Table

    My garden is so weedy, I didn't know I had these melons until I tripped over them. It's rained every third day this summer. That's my excuse. I'm not taking a garden photo unless the produce is cleaned up and on my kitchen table. How's your garden?

    Courtney Yuskis helped me serve lamb at the Iowa Sheep Industry Association stand at the Iowa State Fair. The most popular item was seasoned lamb in pita bread with a cucumber sauce, lettuce, and tomato. Many people had a chance to try lamb for the first time. (Not sure why I wore a Bacon shirt to serve lamb!)

    Bob and I attended a wedding in Willmar, Minnesota, at Stonewall Farms last weekend. The barn was lovely. I thought for a few seconds about converting our barn to a wedding venue. HA.

     

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    August 18, 2016

    Summer Winding Down

    New adventures often begin this time of year. Caroline is heading to Maryland to help my parents on their farm and look for job opportunities. She made a car magnet for Caroline Freese Designs on Facebook.

    My garden is out of control. Who knew two cucumber plants could produce so much? I throw all the overgrown veggies to the lambs, who play with them more than eat them. I have enough tomatoes to fill the back of a pickup truck each week. 

    It's all good.

    Love this bowl Caroline painted for me before she left.

    After about 5:00 at night, these insects make it hard to carry on a conversation outdoors. This cicada has left his shell.

    We flew a drone over our pasture, pond, and barn. Very cool to see the fish in our pond! Check out the video here: https://www.facebook.com/livingcountry/videos

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    August 2, 2016

    Hot air balloons and county fair

    The National Balloon Classic is underway and hot air balloons often go over our farm during the nine days of the festival. They spook the sheep, but it is a good time for the community.

    The county fair has just finished its run. I entered a dozen categories with my vegetables (and peaches), and won many ribbons. Nobody can touch the size of my potatoes.

    Find my potatoes.

    They won the blue ribbon!

    My garden exploded.

    New this year at the fair was a tomato tasting contest. 

    Bob is president of the Warren County Pork Producers, and accepted a Friend of the Fair award for the group.

    Look at those great chainsaw carvings. They are auctioned off to benefit the fair. I love the walnut stump with the old man's face on the left.

    Caroline's portrait of 20,000 Skittles is now hanging at the Indianola Vet Clinic.

    The view from our pasture looking south.

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