10 Deer-resistant plants | Living the Country Life
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10 Deer-resistant plants

While they can be fun to watch, deer can wreak havoc on your landscape. Try these deer-resistant plants this season.
  • Achillea Coronatin Gold

    A showy middle-of-the-border perennial. Its large heads of golden yellow flowers are fine for cutting. The long blooming period, June to August, is a blessing. Foliage is gray and lacy, quite attractive in its own right. "Coronation Gold" makes one of the best dried flowers. Try it in the garden and in a vase with Platycodon.<br>These valuable garden plants from the north temperate zone are widely grown for the masses of flowers they bear throughout much of the summer. Their flattened flower heads introduce a fresh shape into the perennial border. Yarrows thrive in full sun and well-drained soil, and are drought tolerant.<br>

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: July 3, 2012
  • Aquilegia Songbird Trio

    A stunning series of Aquilegia hybrids originally created by the legendary Colorado Columbine king Charlie Weddle, their modest height plus generous displays of relatively large and mostly upward-facing flowers have quickly made the Songbirds a gardeners' favorite. Our well-matched trio features three superb colors. One each of "Cardinal" (a red-and-white bicolor), "Dove" (pure white), and "Goldfinch" (pale primrose).<br>Lacy greens and dancing, late-spring blooms characterize these lovely border plants. Columbines make excellent cut flowers if picked when half open.<br>

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: July 3, 2012
  • Convallaria majalis

    The genus contains a single species, C. majalis, which is among the most useful ground covers for shade. These charming and richly fragrant plants have many bell-shaped white flowers in late spring and are beloved by everyone. In the garden, they spread diligently and will prosper in low light. They are often found near old foundations, where they proved more durable than the houses. Culture is the same as that used for all woodland plants--a woodsy soil (one rich in humus) and a location in shade or well-filtered sunlight. Lily-of-the-Valley is also excellent for forcing.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: July 3, 2012
  • Hellebore Ivory Prince

    This vigorous new hybrid Hellebore produces many creamy white flowers that display well above the leathery evergreen foliage. "Ivory Prince" is vegetatively propagated, rather than a seed strain, assuring you will enjoy the outward-facing blooms and the distinctively veined and toothed foliage. <br>Somewhat particular plants, Hellebores require a moist, shaded site and respond especially well to planting under deep-rooted deciduous trees such as oaks, crab apples and crape myrtles. A mulch of limestone chips also enhances growth and flowering. Supply these basics, however, and Hellebores generally prove tenacious and long-lived, tolerant of drought once rooted in and all but invulnerable to deer and voles.<br>

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: July 3, 2012
  • Lavender Patch

    Lavenders are usually planted in large clumps of one variety, where their soft shade and cool, subtle foliage provide quiet dignity through the summer. In one of our trials, we discovered that a perfectly delightful effect can be had by combining several varieties whose disparate heights, colors, and forms flow together to produce a garden that is interesting and informal, but very definitely Lavender. Of course, there is no 'right' way to combine them.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: July 3, 2012
  • Phlox Candy Stripe

    As you might expect from its common names, moss phlox and creeping phlox, Phlox subulata has needle-thin leaves and forms a ground-hugging carpet. It becomes an eye-catching sheet of flowers in the spring, and is tough and durable the rest of the year, given well-drained soil in full sun. "Candy Stripe" (also called "Tamaongalei") is unusual for its bright, bicolored flowers. Each white petal is streaked through the center with cerise pink, creating a tapestry of brilliant stars that is never gaudy.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: July 3, 2012
  • Prairie Partners

    We love how these unfussy selections of native perennials strut their stuff in tandem. The red-eyed blooms of Heliopsis helianthoides "Prairie Sunset" bask in a color harmony with the feisty cones of Echinacea "Pink Double Delight." Enjoy months of flowers and visits by birds and butterflies.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: July 3, 2012
  • Sempervivum Sampler

    The name of this genus was derived by Pliny from semper vivo and means, literally, live forever. Although each leafy rosette dies after flowering, there always seems to be an abundance of new offsets (the "chicks") to take its place. These fleshy, evergreen plants are invaluable, carefree elements for troughs, rock gardens, or wall crevices. They are content in average to poor soil as long as it is very well-drained and in full sun. It's hard to limit yourself to just one, so we've put together a Semp Sampler.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: July 3, 2012
  • Wings over Water Siberian Iris

    Few flowers can compare with the grace and beauty of the Siberian Iris. Their arching standards and undulating falls, carried on strong stems above grassy, blue-green leaves, flutter in the softest breeze like exotic seabirds playing the wind off an imaginary shore. What's more, no plants are more rugged and reliable. Given full sun or partial shade and average to damp soil, Siberian Iris form large clumps that bloom heavily every year.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: July 3, 2012
  • Deer Resistant Garden for Sun

    Deer won't bother with this garden, but you'll love its long-season of bloom and varied foliage forms and colors. From May through September, the plants in our Deer-Resistant Garden for Sun provide a spectrum of harmonious blooms in shades of blue, rose, yellow, and white, offset by the greens, burgundy, and silvers of foliage. The narrow plumes of Switch Grass carry the show through fall and into winter.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: July 3, 2012
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