Creative Indoor Planting Ideas | Living the Country Life
More
Close

Creative Indoor Planting Ideas

Baby, when it’s cold outside, warm things up indoors with some sunny window gardening.
  • Top Shelf

    These succulent, yellow-blooming Kalanchoe plants will flower for weeks in a sunny window. Repeated plantings create greater impact for the party of cheerful blooms. The removable glass shelves span the window and let plenty of light reach the plants. 

    Date Published: December 20, 2016
    Date Updated: January 3, 2017
  • In the Pink

    Look for a wide selection of dramatically textured and colorful foliage to create interesting houseplant combinations. This grouping includes button fern, peacock plant (Calathea), pink geranium, rex begonia, and pink cyclamen. Group three or five plants with similar needs for light and water, and plant them together in a complementary pot at least 14 inches in diameter. Keep this potted garden going year-round. Between late summer and spring, place it indoors in a site where it will receive bright, indirect light. Before you let the potted garden vacation outdoors over the summer, remove the geranium from the pot and transplant it into a separate container to give the other plants more growing room. Set the potted garden in a place out of direct sun. The geranium will do better in a partly sunny spot.

    Date Published: December 20, 2016
    Date Updated: January 3, 2017
  • Desert Dwelling

    A drywaller’s pan provides a sleek cachepot for small, individually potted plants, such as this collection of succulents and cacti, for a south-facing window. Gravel conceals the pot rims.  

    Date Published: December 20, 2016
    Date Updated: January 3, 2017
  • High-Wire Act

    Tillandsia, or air plants, hang in the air with the greatest of ease in glass ornaments strung on fine wire. The plants need no soil, only daily misting and weekly plunging into tepid water. Bright, indirect light keeps them growing. 

    Date Published: December 20, 2016
    Date Updated: January 3, 2017
  • Show Time

    Pink primroses join fragrant hyacinths, English ivy, and chartreuse Heuchera (coral bells) in a ceramic planter for a display that lasts weeks. When the flowering plants fade, add them to the compost pile, but plant the perennial Heuchera in the garden next spring and transfer the ivy to a new pot of its own.

    Date Published: December 20, 2016
    Date Updated: January 3, 2017
  • Hydrangea Blues

    Although greenhouse-grown hydrangeas are gorgeous with their mopheads (whether in blue, purple, pink, or white), they have been raised for a spectacular one-time show indoors. Combine a hydrangea in a spacious pot with varieties of ferns and other houseplants that also like damp conditions. The hydrangea may be willing to move outdoors in spring and adapt to growing in the garden in Zone 6 and warmer.

    Date Published: December 20, 2016
    Date Updated: January 3, 2017
  • “Herban” Renewal

    Beauty and bounty come from aromatic herbs conveniently located for use in the kitchen. This group includes (from left to right) flat-leaf parsley, basil, Greek oregano, and rosemary, poised on a metal shelf mounted to the bottom of the window frame. Perch them in the sunniest window of the house for best results.

    Date Published: December 20, 2016
    Date Updated: January 3, 2017
  • Ivy Enchantment

    Create a delightful topiary in less than 20 minutes with flourishing ivy. Choose a plant with at least six runners or purchase six small ivy plants with one long runner each. Transform the plants into a captivating form by adding a spherical topiary frame to the potted planting. Start by pressing a topiary frame into the center of the pot, anchoring it as deeply as possible in the soil. Separate the ivy runners and wrap one or more around each of the wires in the topiary frame. If the ivy runners start out short, wrap them around the wires from time to time as they grow longer.

    Date Published: December 20, 2016
    Date Updated: January 3, 2017
  • Purple Leaves

    A duo of yellow pots, suspended from a curtain rod with cinch hangers, make a colorful impact when planted up with purple inch plant (Tradescantia zebrina). 

    Date Published: December 20, 2016
    Date Updated: January 3, 2017

Latest Blogs

Betsy's Backyard |
2/15/17 | 3:26 PM
I was asked to send in a recipe to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Calvert (...read more
Everyday Gardeners |
2/3/17 | 1:54 PM
Our northern winter landscape has been pleading for greenery lately. My cue to stop...read more

Add Your Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login