Easy herbs to grow from seed | Living the Country Life
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Easy herbs to grow from seed

Start these easy-growing herbs indoors, or just grow them in containers on your patio or in a sunny window, for a beautiful, tasty herb garden!
  • Basil

    There are dozens of different types of basil available. Choose from a classic Italian or Greek flavor, or try a different variety with hints of lemon, chocolate, cinnamon, clove, and anise. Plant several varieties and have fun experimenting with them in the kitchen! Basil is great in salads, sauces, pesto, and pizza.

    Date Published: April 20, 2012
    Date Updated: December 5, 2013
  • Chamomile

    Chamomile produces pretty white flowers that resemble tiny daisies. Clip into steaming-hot water for your own homemade tea, or toss some into the bath and enjoy a relaxing soak. Chamomile is known for being a tummy soother and sleep inducer, so try a cup before bed.

    Date Published: April 20, 2012
    Date Updated: December 5, 2013
  • Chives

    Chives are a delicious, useful herb. Snip them on top of baked potatoes, in salads, and on pasta. This herb will often self-seed when planted in the garden, but it also grows well in containers. Thanks to the pretty blossoms chives produce, they'll fit right in your flower or vegetable garden.

    Date Published: April 20, 2012
    Date Updated: December 5, 2013
  • Chervil

    Chervil may not come immediately to mind when you think of herbs to plant, but give it a try. It's closely related to parsley, but has a subtle anise flavor. Try it in recipes that call for parsley!

    Date Published: April 20, 2012
    Date Updated: December 5, 2013
  • Cilantro/coriander

    Also called Chinese parsley, cilantro is often used in Mexican and Thai cooking. Add the leaves to tomatoes, onions and peppers from your garden and sprinkle with lime juice for a tasty pico. The seeds (coriander) that grow on the stalk ends can be dried and used in cooking, or planted for another crop of cilantro.

    Date Published: April 20, 2012
    Date Updated: December 5, 2013
  • Dill

    Dill's flat, golden flower heads welcome bees, butterflies and other beneficial insects to your garden. The foliage adds wonderful flavor to bread, stews, pickles, and egg dishes. When transplanted into the garden, dill will often self-seed.

    Date Published: April 20, 2012
    Date Updated: December 5, 2013
  • Fennel

    Fennel is used in many recipes, and the bulb, foliage, and seeds can all be used in cooking. Harvest the foliage by snipping shoots once the plant grows to 18 inches. When the bulb grows to 3 inches in diameter, dig the whole plant and store bulbs in the refrigerator.

    Date Published: April 20, 2012
    Date Updated: December 5, 2013
  • Lemon balm

    Lemon balm has a wonderful aroma, so it makes a nice planting on patios. The plant will attract bees, so it's also useful for planting among vegetables that need pollinating. Use the leaves in fruit salads, lemonade and other beverages, vegetable dishes, and in marinades for fish and lamb.

    Date Published: April 20, 2012
    Date Updated: December 5, 2013
  • Marjoram

    Try planting your marjoram in hanging containers, and it will trail over the sides beautifully. Use 1/2 cup of marjoram leaves and 1/2 cup of mint leaves, steep in a cup of hot water, strain, and enjoy a delicious tea. Marjoram is also a tasty addition to soups, eggs, tomato dishes, and salad dressings.

    Date Published: April 20, 2012
    Date Updated: December 5, 2013
  • Parsley

    Both curly (shown here) and flat-leaf parsley are super easy herbs that require no maintenance at all. The flat-leaf has a stronger flavor and can be used in stews and sauces, while curly parsley has a crisp taste and is best used in salads, vegetable dishes, and herb butters.

    Date Published: April 20, 2012
    Date Updated: December 5, 2013
  • Sage

    In addition to being a wonderfully flavorful herb, well-established sage plants are drought resistant distasteful to deer. Perfect for acreages! Dry sage to use it year-round. It's delicious in stuffing, soup, marinades, and other dishes. Rubbing the leaves on your skin helps repel insects, and hanging dried sprigs in your closet helps deter moths.

    Date Published: April 20, 2012
    Date Updated: December 5, 2013
  • Thyme

    This Greek herb thrives in dry conditions, and actually tastes better the drier it is. After the plants bloom, cut off about one-third of the stems. Thyme has a savory flavor that is a great addition to dishes like roasted vegetables, soups, and sauces. It also goes will with all kinds of meat.

    Date Published: April 20, 2012
    Date Updated: December 5, 2013

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