Fall lawncare | Living the Country Life
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Fall lawncare

Keep your lawn in shape for springtime. Written By: Ivy Christianson.
  • Prep for spring!

    Fall is a great time to start thinking about spring gardening. Read up for several ideas on how to get your lawn and garden ready for warmer weather.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Keep landscaping.

    Although much of landscaping is done in the spring and summer, there are still things you can do to keep your lawn looking fresh. You may work on building walkways, patios and decks; it's at least less hot outside, making it a much less painful task!

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Your plants are still thirsty.

    Even though land tends to look barren once fall hits, some plants are still growing and others use water to adapt to winter weather. Continue watering on schedule, but avoid watering in evenings to elude fungal disease. Especially saturate shrubs and trees if there hasn't been enough rain.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Operation overseed

    Before overseeding, mow lawn 1/2-inch shorter than usual and remove any leftover clippings. Warm-season lawns should be seeded with ryegrass each autumn. Northern climates need to overseed thin or large dead areas of grass. Keep these newly seeded sections moist while seeds sprout but steadily increase the interval between waterings to encourage deeper rootage.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Know what "thatch" is

    Thatch is dead organic matter mixed with living plant parts. And while it sounds like a basic type of brush, it can actually lead to disease and insect problems if not taken care of in a timely manner. To test for thatch, remove a small plug of grass and soil. If your sample has more than 1/2-inch, call a thatch-management program. You can remove it yourself, by cutting through the thatch layer and ripping out debris with power rakes or vertical mowers.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Rake it up

    It's essential to remove fallen leaves, as grass still needs sunlight, it's creating sugars to store in its root system for good spring growth. Rake or mulch these leaves. The mulch can return shredded organic material back to the soil, readying it for a bountiful spring.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Move woody plants

    Now is a good time to transplant shrubs or small trees for relocation. If you've been eyeing a new spot for your plants, move them when the leaves of deciduous wood plants turn colors and start to drop.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Have a warm mindset

    Spring isn't far around the corner, so watch for end of the season sales to get spring seeds at a cheap price. Not only that, but dig up summer bulbs if you want to keep them. After the first frost, dig up dahlias, cannas, gladioli and other non-hardy bulbs for winter storage.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Protect trees

    Young trees don't quite have the brute strength full-grown trees have, so to preserve them, wrap a plastic or wire mesh tree guard around the trunk. If your plants are stationed near a road and are splashed with salt spray, a double layer of burlap around the trunk should help maintain the plant's vitality.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Prevent animal damage

    Tree guards surely help remedy the mess caused by rabbits, but chicken wire can also be used around plants they find most tasty. Or you can try a pest repellant spray on lower trunks, branches and stems. Reapply the spray if there has been wet weather.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Pick perennials

    When fall hits, we're often clamoring for any remaining bits of summer. Perennials often serve as the last glimmering hope of life until the ground thaws. So try to select perennial plants that can make it through the tumultuous weather. Choose a plant that has resistance to disease and insects, a tolerance of a wide range of growing conditions, a long blooming period and that won't take over the garden.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Maintain your perennial

    You can cut down dying perennial foliage, but consider leaving seed heads and dried foliage to feed birds. Plant or transplant overgrown perennials and then prune them 4 to 5-inches off the ground.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
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