Try Edible Flowers | Living the Country Life
More
Close

Try Edible Flowers

Use the power of the petal to add color and taste to any dish or salad. Whether growing your own or buying, make sure you only eat organically grown flowers.
  • Chives

    These small lavender flowers have heads powerful in flavor; break them apart for salads. For more blooms, pick flowers before they go to seed. Both the blooms and thin, hollow leaves have a mild oniony flavor. As an herbaceous perennial, chives die back in winter and return to spring. Plants spread to form clumps 12 inches (30 cm) tall and wide. They need full sun and well-drained soil.

    Date Published: January 16, 2018
    Date Updated: April 13, 2018
  • Nasturtium

    Nasturtium is one of the easiest flowers to grow all season long. The peppery flavor from both the leaves and flowers of this annual adds zip to sandwiches and salads. Some varieties, like Dwarf Jewel Mix or variegated Alaska Mix, are more floriferous than climbers. Plants grow 12 inches tall and wide and require full sun to partial shade and well-drained soil. 

    Date Published: January 16, 2018
    Date Updated: April 13, 2018
  • Pansy

    Pansies are annuals or half-hardy perennials that flower throughout the season and, in mild climates, in winter. From smaller to larger varieties, pansies are pretty in salads and on plates. Plants grow 12 inches tall and wide, and prefer full sun to partial shade and need well-drained soil.

    Date Published: January 16, 2018
    Date Updated: April 13, 2018
  • Daylily

    Daylilies have a mild flavor and can be eaten raw or used in cooking, such as a stir-fry. They can also be stuffed or used to decorate any dish or bowl. Many selections of this perennial are available, including the dwarf long-blooming, yellow-flower "Stella d'Oro." Plants grow 3 feet tall and 1 foot wide. these flowers need full sun and well-drained soil. 

    Date Published: January 16, 2018
    Date Updated: April 13, 2018
  • Calendula

    Flowers flourish in spring and, in cool-weather regions, through summer. Use petals to color salads. Although calendula reseeds, get better flowering by using a fresh packet every year, starting indoors early. For continued flowering, deadhead constantly. Plants grow 24 inches tall and wide and need full sun to partial shade and well-drained soil.

    Date Published: January 16, 2018
    Date Updated: April 13, 2018
  • Rose

    Two rugosa selections are preferred for culinary purposes: "Hansa" and "Buffalo Gal." Rose petals can be used fresh or dried. They can be tossed into a salad or used to flavor tea, honey, syrup, or ice cream. Plants grow 4 feet tall and 3 feet wide. Roses often need full sun and well-drained soil. 

    Date Published: January 16, 2018
    Date Updated: April 13, 2018
  • More Edible Flowers

    The experts at our sister site, BHG.com, offer these tips:

    • If you cannot positively identify a flower as edible, don't eat it. 
    • If you have asthma, hay fever, or other allergies, do not eat flowers.
    • Never eat flowers from a nursery, garden center, or florist; they are likely to have chemical residues that concentrate in the flowers.

     

    Here are some other edible flowers:

    • Anise hyssop
    • Bee balm
    • Borage
    • Chamomile
    • Dianthus (petals only)
    • Hollyhock
    • Honeysuckle
    • Johnny jump-up
    • Lilacs
    • Marigolds (gem hybrid petals)
    • Scented geraniums
    • Sweet woodruff
    • Tuberous begonias
    • Tulips (except bulbs)
    • Violets
    • Yucca
    Date Published: January 16, 2018
    Date Updated: April 13, 2018

Latest Blogs

Betsy's Backyard |
5/25/18 | 11:05 AM
My daughter, Caroline, said she missed my blog, so I'm going to download a few ...read more
Betsy's Backyard |
3/12/18 | 1:18 PM
The Living the Country Life Spring/Summer 2018 issue comes out this month. I loved the...read more

Add Your Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login