Why you should add iris to your garden | Living the Country Life
More
Close

Why you should add iris to your garden

Iris are the perfect flowers to add delicacy and color to your garden. These iris were photographed by Rachel Miller in her mother's lovely flower gardens on her acreage in Wisconsin.
  • Courtesy of Audrey's Garden/Rachel Miller

    Bearded iris

    Iris are believed to have been in existence since 1469 B.C. in Egypt and Syria. Brought to the United States in the early 1600s, these beautiful flowers have stood the test of time. Historically used for medicine, perfume, and incense in religous ceremonies, iris today are sometimes used in gin for flavor and color. The flower has been used by artists for centuries. It is depicted in the well-known symbol fleur-de-lis, which is used in art, architecture, flags, and as the Boy Scouts symbol.

    Date Published: May 25, 2017
    Date Updated: May 26, 2017
  • Courtesy of Audrey's Garden/Rachel Miller

    Iris varieties

    There are so many varieties to choose from, we are sure you will find one or 12 that will look especially beautiful in your garden.

    With nearly 300 iris species in six different classes, the iris belongs to the Iridaceae family, which includes crocus, freesias, and gladioli. The iris many people in the U.S. are most familiar with is the bearded or German iris, named for the fluffy tuft extending down from the falls of the flower.

    Date Published: May 25, 2017
    Date Updated: May 26, 2017
  • Courtesy of Audrey's Garden/Rachel Miller

    Bloom season

    After the earliest spring flowers have come and gone, the iris stand tall and colors gardens with blooms in late spring and early summer. Some species even bloom again in the late summer. Iris love and need the sun to encourage blooms, and do best in full sun or at at least half a day of partial sun.

    Date Published: May 25, 2017
    Date Updated: May 26, 2017
  • Courtesy of Audrey's Garden/Rachel Miller

    Iris rizomes are easy to plant

    The rizomes or roots are easy to plant and don't require digging up in the fall and replanting in the spring like the bulbs of so many other flowers.

    There is no need to dig a big hole! Iris like to be planted in shallow 4-inch holes atop a small mound of dirt.

    Date Published: May 25, 2017
    Date Updated: May 26, 2017
  • Courtesy of Audrey's Garden/Rachel Miller

    Transplanting iris

    When you have too many you can make more! Dividing and transplanting is easy and encouraged every three to four years. Usually, they are able to be transpanted after bloom or can be done at a number of times during the season depending on the variety. 

    Any soil that is slightly acidic and well drained will do. Don't overmulch. Don't trim the leaves back; they are needed to continue the growth of the plant. To clean up your flower beds, simply remove the spent blooms and trim the stems back to beneath the leaves.

    Date Published: May 25, 2017
    Date Updated: May 26, 2017
  • Courtesy of Audrey's Garden/Rachel Miller

    Iris are easy

    The number one reason we love iris is they are easy to grow in so many areas. Many hybird iris can go in zones 4-9, from Texas to Canada. They are also deer resistant and drought tolerant, so they don't require frequent watering like the annuals many people like to plant.

    Date Published: May 25, 2017
    Date Updated: May 26, 2017
  • Courtesy of Audrey's Garden/Rachel Miller

    Other types of iris

    Crested iris

    Beardless iris

    Bulbling iris

    Siberian iris

    Japanese iris

    Louisiana iris

    Wild iris

    Date Published: May 25, 2017
    Date Updated: May 26, 2017

Latest Blogs

Betsy's Backyard |
5/25/18 | 11:05 AM
My daughter, Caroline, said she missed my blog, so I'm going to download a few ...read more
Betsy's Backyard |
3/12/18 | 1:18 PM
The Living the Country Life Spring/Summer 2018 issue comes out this month. I loved the...read more

Add Your Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login