Top 10 Tips on Succulents | Living the Country Life
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Top 10 Tips on Succulents

These pretty little plants are easy to grow, and bring back memories of Grandmother's garden.
  • So many succulents!

    Succulents are all the rage among gardeners this year. These adaptable, durable plants store water and nutrients in their leaves, stems, or roots, which means you don't have to water them every day like some plants. All cacti are succulents, but not all succulents are cacti. Other examples include aloe, jade, agave, and hens and chicks. They come in an endless variety of shapes, sizes, and colors, and their texture makes them an interesting addition to any garden!

    Date Published: May 5, 2013
    Date Updated: May 17, 2013
  • Buying succulents

    You can find succulents online or at your local garden center, or if you're lucky, a friend will share them with you. When buying, look for plants with new growth and healthy looking leaves. Plant in a small, shallow container, in a mixture of two parts coarse sand or perlite, one part organic material, and one part garden soil. Put in a sunny spot, and water only when leaves begin to droop or look dented. Some succulents will have to be brought inside in the winter, depending on your zone. Those that can stay out all year may be planted directly in flower gardens.

    Date Published: May 5, 2013
    Date Updated: May 17, 2013
  • More colorful than you might imagine

    This gorgeous planter shows just how much variety you can find when it comes to succulents. Leaves may be large or small, pointy or rounded. Some are shaped like dahlias, while others have vining properties, and a wide range of colors is available. Planting several similar succulents in one container makes an impact, but mixing and matching is beautiful too!

    Date Published: May 5, 2013
    Date Updated: May 17, 2013
  • Keep them contained

    Because they don't have a deep root system, succulents do well in shallow containers. These hens and chicks are very happy crowded together in a short terra cotta pot. The smaller, new growth plants ("chicks") can be transplanted to other containers or shared with friends. These old-fashioned succulents were favorites of rural women over the past few generations, and they are once again gaining in popularity. 

    Date Published: May 5, 2013
    Date Updated: May 17, 2013
  • Party plants

    While some plants require lots of room to be happy, succulents actually do better in small containers or planted close together. It's easier to control the moisture level in smaller containers, and even these colorful food cans make great homes for succulents. Plus, with a colorful pom-pom ribbon and some bright table linens, they're the perfect centerpiece for an outdoor fiesta!

    Date Published: May 5, 2013
    Date Updated: May 17, 2013
  • Group photo

    Try planting several different types of succulents in small containers, then grouping them together in a flower garden or on your deck or patio table. They form a blanket of texture and color, and it's easy to rearrange them whenever you like!

    Date Published: May 5, 2013
    Date Updated: May 17, 2013
  • Gutter planting

    What a great idea for planting succulents! Hang a piece of gutter from your deck or porch railing, or from a fence or gate, and fill with soil and a wide variety of succulents. Beautiful! Hanging a short piece of gutter with capped ends underneath your windows would be an easy, inexpensive way to create a windowbox, too!

    Date Published: May 5, 2013
    Date Updated: May 17, 2013
  • Go vertical!

    Vertical gardening is very popular, with examples all over Pinterest and other sites. Succulents can be planted into a vertical garden. Lie a shallow box on the ground, drill holes for drainage, fill with soil mixture, tack hardware cloth over the top, and plant, cutting holes in the cloth as needed. Leave the planter flat on the ground until the plants take a firm hold in the soil, then hang on a wall or fence. To water, lie the frame back on the ground. Leave it flat for a while after watering, until most of the water has drained out, then hang again.

    Date Published: May 5, 2013
    Date Updated: May 17, 2013
  • Living wreath

    A living wreath like this is basically a vertical garden planted in a wreath form. Wrap burlap or garden cloth around a wire wreath frame. You can find plant-able frames like this at hobby or garden shops or online, or you can make your own with a regular wire wreath frame wrapped in burlap or garden cloth and filled with soil mixture. Like with the vertical garden box, lie this wreath flat to water, and let it drain before re-hanging.

    Date Published: May 5, 2013
    Date Updated: May 17, 2013
  • Pucker up!

    Kissing balls are symbols of love and commitment, and are popular decorations for weddings and Christmas. They're also beautiful at garden parties or just as an accent on the porch. This example was made with a large ball made of florist's foam. Hens and chicks and roses were pinned all around, with hanging succulents and crystals cascading from the bottom. To make a design like this last after the party's over, form the ball with chicken wire, fill with soil, cover with burlap or other garden cloth to keep the soil in place, and cut slits for planting succulents.

    Date Published: May 5, 2013
    Date Updated: May 17, 2013

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