Pinecone Bouquets for Winter Decorating | Living the Country Life
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Pinecone Bouquets for Winter Decorating

Capture the elegance of the season by mixing pinecones and branches gathered from your backyard with blooms from the florist shop. Fashion these woodsy winter floral displays in creative containers to elevate their appeal.
  • Photography by Keller + Keller

    Mums Centerpiece with Candle

    Create a lovely winter centerpiece with branches of red pine and white chrysanthemums. Find a wooden salad bowl or other wide container to hold the arrangement. Cut florists foam even with the top of the container. Wet the foam, set it in the bowl, and push a birch-look pillar candle into the center. Stick some pine branches, preferably with cones attached, into the foam around the candle. Gather the chrysanthemums—a mix of white spider, football, and garden mums. Trim the stems short and insert them into the foam so the varied blossoms overlap at different heights. Cover the top of the bowl in white flowers to create a snowdrift effect. Tuck a few leaves of gray-green dusty miller around the edge of the arrangement for a wintry finishing touch.

    Date Published: November 16, 2016
    Date Updated: December 1, 2016
  • Photography by Keller + Keller

    Pinecone Vase

    A pinecone vase makes the perfect winter crafts project. It is easy to make and ideal for displaying winter arrangements. Choose a can or jar for a small vase or a bucket for a large one. Glue pinecones to the container, pressing them close together, using cones of different shapes to create a mosaic effect. Layer or overlap the cones for complete. For scale, work with smaller cones on a little vase and save the larger cones for a big container. Place wet florists foam in the finished vase. Add foliage, such as ivy, pittosporum, and andromeda (Pieris), to break up the solid look of the rim. Last, add poppy anemone, sea holly (Eryngium), and feathers to bring balance and complete the design. 

    Date Published: November 16, 2016
    Date Updated: December 1, 2016
  • Photography by Keller + Keller

    Orchids in a Novel Vase

    Thanks to the handmade vase, this design is more than a flower arrangement. It’s also a conversation piece. Find a can (such as a large chicken broth can) and books with damaged or frayed covers. Using a crafts knife, cut through an old book cover ¼ inch away from the spine on either side. Pull the spine away from the cover. Fold and glue the extra 1/4 inch on both sides to the spine backing. Repeat with each old book cover. Glue the prepared spines vertically to the can, covering it completely.

    Fit florists foam into the can, and wet it thoroughly. Insert rhododendron leaves, orchids, and protea into the foam. Cut orchids and rhododendron leaves last for weeks indoors. Even leaves that look lifeless outdoors will revive indoors in warm water. Attach pinecones with wire to florist’s sticks or wooden kabob spears and place them at the outer edge of the design.

    Date Published: November 16, 2016
    Date Updated: December 1, 2016
  • Photography by Keller + Keller

    Antique Tin with Orange Flowers

    Antique tins make excellent containers any time of year. For this arrangement, a yellow tin complements gold, orange, and white flowers. Dark brown pinecones and magnolia leaves with their felted orange-brown bottoms add to the color harmony.

    To replicate this design, place wet florist’s foam in a large tin. Insert variegated pittosporum and ivy around the can edges to break the straight lines and to create a border. Wire oranges and pinecones to wooden kabob spears to give them height, then insert them into the foam. Remove the leaves from gold alstroemeria stems and wire five or six stems together under the flowers to create an azalea-like cluster, repeating until all the stems are grouped. Add the alstroemeria, white roses, and the white and orange ranunculus to the arrangement.

    Date Published: November 16, 2016
    Date Updated: December 1, 2016
  • Photography by Keller + Keller

    Vintage Colors Bouquet

    This arrangement, in shades of brown, green, and white, has a vintage look thanks to the antique Roseville vase. Various-size tan and brown pinecones give texture to the design and set off the white tulips and calla lilies, muted green eucalyptus, and earth-tone container. Use wet florist’s foam in the vase to hold the stems in place. When the original fresh flowers fade, add more water and new blooms or keep the cones, rice flowers, and eucalyptus as a dried arrangement for the rest of winter. Although the rice flowers start out fresh, they will dry in place.

    Date Published: November 16, 2016
    Date Updated: December 1, 2016
  • Photography by Keller + Keller

    Lilies and Cones in Footed Dish

    This asymmetrical floral design in a footed shallow dish adds elegance to any space. Start by cutting florist’s foam to fit the dimensions of the dish—here, just 1 inch high. Wet the foam thoroughly. Cover it with cones of different sizes and shapes until you cannot see the foam. We started with Oriental Sorbonne and white lilies. Cut two or three short stems of lilies, depending upon the size of the container and the number of flowers per stalk. Push lily stems into the foam between the cones on one side of the dish. On the other side, stick into the foam curvaceous flower spires of gooseneck loosestrife (Lysimachia clethroides) and an evergreen sprig so they trail off the container’s edge. Insert cyclamen between the lilies and gooseneck to intensify the pink color and fill out the design. A dried brown lotus pod makes a striking addition to the design. 

    Date Published: November 16, 2016
    Date Updated: December 1, 2016
  • Photography by Keller + Keller

    Amaryllis on Cigar Boxes

    This container made from cigar boxes enhances giant amaryllis blooms. By stacking three boxes, the arrangement gains height and interest. The top box is deep enough to hold a small vase containing deep red amaryllis, black scabious (Scabiosa), magenta chrysanthemums, and yellow and dark purple tulips. In the empty space around the vase, mound little pinecones from the garden until they overflow the rim of the box, giving the arrangement a wintry flair.

    Date Published: November 16, 2016
    Date Updated: December 1, 2016

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