Spring Arrangements with Hyacinth | Living the Country Life
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Spring Arrangements with Hyacinth

Fragrant hyacinths star in these five arrangements that you can put together right now!
  • Hyacinth Punch Bowl

    A vintage glass punch bowl makes a light-catching centerpiece, especially when brimming with glass pieces and forced blooms. Here hyacinth bulbs (9 to 12 bulbs) snuggle in a bed of clear recycled glass and white garden rock that mimics ice and snow. 

    Date Published: February 15, 2017
    Date Updated: March 2, 2017
  • Mixed Spring Blooms

    PoThis garden idea comes with a bonus: It includes perennial plants that will live on long after the spring-flowering plants have finished their show. In early spring, combine hyacinth bulbs with cool-season bedding plants (viola and flowering kale) and other prechilled bulbs (mini daffodils) in a roomy pot outdoors. Add a young hydrangea and delphinium to the center of the container; transplant both to the garden in early fall, after companions fade. 

    MATERIALS

    • 12-inch glazed ceramic pot
    • Hydrangea serrata
    • 2 Delphinium ‘Black Knight’
    • 2 Flowering kale ‘Dynasty Red’
    • 2 Flowering kale ‘Emperor Red’
    • 4 Viola ‘Ocean Breeze’
    • 4 Narcissus ‘Tete-a-Tete’
    • Hyacinth bulbs
    • Potting soil
    Date Published: February 15, 2017
    Date Updated: March 2, 2017
  • Branches and Blooms

    Slender canning jars are just right for a windowsill garden. Each one holds a hyacinth bulb inside a tepee of flowering branches. Stand a half-dozen forsythia and pussy-willow branches in each jar, place a bulb inside them—the stems should hold the bulb near the top of the jar—and tie the branch tops with a bit of raffia to form a tepee. Add enough water to each jar to sustain the bulb and the branches.

    MATERIALS

    • Quilted glass jelly jars
    • Spring-flowering branches
    • Hyacinth bulbs
    • Raffia
    Date Published: February 15, 2017
    Date Updated: March 2, 2017
  • Hyacinth and Houseplants

    Tuck a handful of your prechilled and rooted bulbs into a pot of houseplants, where they’ll create a colorful and surprisingly pretty display. Plant the bulbs in spots where they’ll have room to continue rooting. When the hyacinths have finished blooming, gently tug them out, releasing their roots from the soil.

    MATERIALS

    • 8-inch glazed earthenware planter 
    • Potting soil 
    • Dracaena sanderiana 
    • Dracaena marginata ‘Tricolor’ 
    • Peperomia ‘Rainbow’ 
    • Epipremnum aureum (formerly known as pothos)
    • 6 hyacinth bulbs
    Date Published: February 15, 2017
    Date Updated: March 2, 2017
  • Cylinder Support for Spring Bulbs

    Place several inches of colorful marbles in the bottom of a clear glass pillar, add water to just below the marbles’ surface, and—voila!—you have made a perfect home for hyacinths in minutes. The container supports the top-heavy flowers and keeps them upright as they bloom. The marbles allow room for root development while suspending the bulbs above the water.

    MATERIALS

    • 6x12-inch glass vase
    • Swirl glass marbles
    • 4 hyacinth bulbs
    Date Published: February 15, 2017
    Date Updated: March 2, 2017
  • Prechilled Bulbs

    Purchase pre-chilled hyacinth bulbs from a garden center or mail-order source. Choose plump, firm bulbs in an array of colors from white to pinks to blues and purples, with single or double flowers. All the flowers are intensely fragrant. Or, chill your own by placing the bulbs in a paper bag. Store the bag of bulbs in the refrigerator away from apples or other fruits. After 12 to 14 weeks of chilling, it’s time to trick your bulbs into behaving as if winter is over and spring has come. Your bulbs will most likely develop roots and bloom in about 8 more weeks.

    Date Published: February 15, 2017
    Date Updated: March 2, 2017
  • How to Force Hyacinth

    Plant your bulbs in a pot of soil, leaving their tips poking out of the soil. Or force them in water: by setting them in a forcing vase or a container filled with glass beads or gravel. Add water until it barely reaches the surface of the stones. Set the hyacinth bulbs so their bottoms just touch the water. Avoid immersing the bulbs in water because they will rot. Place the bucket or pot in a cool room out of direct sunlight. After several weeks, the bulbs will begin to show signs of growth that resemble little green noses. Add water as needed only to reach the developing roots. Move the bucket or pot into a warmer room with more light. Within a few more weeks, your bulbs will be ready for gentle transplanting into pretty arrangements. To use potted bulbs in arrangements, unpot them and gently tug their roots apart. Rinse any soil off the roots.

    Date Published: February 15, 2017
    Date Updated: March 2, 2017

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