6 Favorite Fruits for Your Orchard | Living the Country Life
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6 Favorite Fruits for Your Orchard

Discover the joy of growing fruit trees, which are beautiful in spring and bountiful in summer and fall. Enjoy your harvest fresh from the tree or in baked goods, jams, and more.
  • Planning Your Own Orchard

    Start by deciding what fruits you want to grow and how you plan to use them. Do you want the fruits for fresh eating, baking, making jams and jellies, or turning into cider? Explore the fruits at farmers markets, and do some research before deciding which varieties to grow.

    Be sure to choose varieties suited to your climate. Bear in mind that some fruit trees need to be cross-pollinated by another variety. If you don't see the phrase "self-fertile" on the plant tag or in the catalog copy, your tree needs cross-pollination.

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 18, 2017
    Tags: Trees
  • 1. Peaches

    Peach trees can grow in USDA zones 4-8, but do especially well in zones 6 and 7. Most peach trees are self-pollinating and live 15 to 20 years. Where late frosts are common, plant on the north side to delay spring flowering; elsewhere, plant trees on a south-facing slope. "Redhaven" peaches are known for their taste and medium-size, and are a common choice for planting. 

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 18, 2017
    Tags: Trees
  • 2. Apples

    Apples grow well in zones 3 to 10. Plant at least two trees for cross-pollination, and pick varieties that bloom around the same time. Try antique varieties (like Jonathon, McIntosh, or Empire) for tried-and-true flavor or newer cultivars (like Honeycrisp or Czech Republic) with better disease-resistance. 

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 18, 2017
    Tags: Trees
  • 3. Pears

    These trees need cross-pollination, so plan to plant at least two pear trees in your orchard. Most trees will start producing fruit in four to six years. Pears grow well in zones 4 to 9. 

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 18, 2017
    Tags: Trees
  • 4. Cherries

    Cherries grow best in zones 3 to 9. Before deciding what to plant, consider what you plan to do with the fruit. Sweet cherries are often eaten fresh, while sour cherries are used for jams and pies. Two varieties are needed to pollinate sweet cherry trees, but sour cherry trees are self-fertile. 

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 18, 2017
    Tags: Trees
  • 5. Lemons

    Choose a location that gets at least 8 hours of sun per day, and isn't blocked by many trees or buildings. Lemons are also highly susceptible to frost damage and require higher temperatures than most other fruits, and grow well in zones 9 to 11. 

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 18, 2017
    Tags: Trees
  • 6. Oranges

    Choose a variety of sweet oranges to make some fresh O.J. straight from your backyard! Orange trees thrive in temperatures between 55 and 100 degrees F, and do well in zones 9 to 11, like lemons. 

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 18, 2017
    Tags: Trees

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