6 Fruit Trees to Expand Your Orchard | Living the Country Life
More
Close

6 Fruit Trees to Expand Your Orchard

Got the urge to try some new flavors in the coming years? Consider adding these fruit trees to your backyard.
  • 1. Apricot

    Most apricot trees are self-pollinating and produce fruit with orange flesh that is often canned or dried. They grow well in Zones 5 to 8, but some varieties survive Zone 3 winters; they are, however, early bloomers and susceptible to fluctuating spring temperatures. Cultivars such as "Harglow," "Hargrand," and "Harlayne" are disease-resilient varieties for the North. "Early Golden" does better in the South and Southwest. 

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 15, 2017
    Tags: Trees
  • 2. Plum/Prune

    Homegrown fruits have excellent flavor if tree-ripened, which they never are commercially. Plums are among the easiest fruits to grow in Zones 5 to 7 (and can do well in Zones 5 to 9). There are many self-fertile cultivars available, such as the popular "Stanley." Plums bloom early in spring, so avoid frost pockets and windy sites when you plant. 

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 15, 2017
    Tags: Trees
  • 3. Pawpaw

    These trees produce tropical-like fruit with vanilla or banana-mango flavors. "Fairchild" and "Mitchell" need cross pollination; "Sunflower" is self-fertile. Little care is needed as far as pruning or pest control. Pawpaw takes part shade and grows best in Zones 5 to 8. 

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 15, 2017
    Tags: Trees
  • 4. Pomegranate

    These beautiful subtropical trees produce coppery new growth, red-orange flowers, red fruit with edible seeds, and gold-yellow foliage in the fall. Pomegranate trees are self-fertile but can be fickle about fruiting in all but the hottest climates. They grow in Zones 7 to 10. 

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 15, 2017
    Tags: Trees
  • 5. Fig

    Most figs are hardy in Zones 8 to 10, but "Brown Turkey" and "Celeste" tolerate colder temperatures. If planted in pots, trees can be overwintered in a minimally heated greenhouse or cold basement. 

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 15, 2017
    Tags: Trees
  • 6. Persimmon

    These trees produce fruit similar to apricots that can be used in jams, pies, puddings, and breads. Popular varieties such as "Hachiya" are astringent until fully ripe, but "Fuyu" and "Jiro" can be eaten crsip. They grow in Zones 7 to 10, and in Zones 5 or 6, try American persimmon. 

    Date Published: September 15, 2017
    Date Updated: September 15, 2017
    Tags: Trees

Latest Blogs

Betsy's Backyard |
5/25/18 | 11:05 AM
My daughter, Caroline, said she missed my blog, so I'm going to download a few ...read more
Betsy's Backyard |
3/12/18 | 1:18 PM
The Living the Country Life Spring/Summer 2018 issue comes out this month. I loved the...read more

Add Your Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login