9 popular Christmas tree species | Living the Country Life
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9 popular Christmas tree species

Choose a live Christmas tree and fill your home with fragrance and natural beauty!
  • Take a trip to the tree farm!

    Load up the family, pack a container of hot chocolate, and head to your local Christmas tree farm! Chances are, there will be several species of evergreens available, so how do you know which one is best? Take a look at some of the more popular types of Christmas trees, and have a few species in mind before you get to the farm. Keep in mind, the types of trees you'll find will vary from region to region.

    BONUS VIDEO - CLICK BELOW TO WATCH HOW TO GROW CHRISTMAS TREES

     

    Date Published: November 16, 2012
    Date Updated: November 16, 2012
  • Douglas Fir

    This dependable, long-lived cut tree has a pyramidal shape and blue to dark green needles.

    Date Published: November 16, 2012
    Date Updated: November 16, 2012
  • Fraser Fir

    The bicolor needles on this tree are deep green on top, and silvery white underneath. The slender profile makes this a good choice for small rooms. This tree also has a rich fragrance that will fill the room.

    Date Published: November 16, 2012
    Date Updated: November 16, 2012
  • Noble Fir

    Cool blue-green, dense, upwardly curved needles fill the well-spaced branches of this tree. It only grows well in the Pacific Northwest, but may be available elsewhere if shipped in.

    Date Published: November 16, 2012
    Date Updated: November 16, 2012
  • Scotch Pine

    This is the most popular Christmas tree, probably because it's the easiest to grow in a wide range of climates and soils. It has a classic, conical shape, and holds its needles well.

    Date Published: November 16, 2012
    Date Updated: November 16, 2012
  • Eastern White Pine

    Long, soft green needles and long, decorative pinecones make for a beautiful Christmas tree. The scent from this tree is rich and beautiful as well. This tree may need watering more often than other species.

    Date Published: November 16, 2012
    Date Updated: November 16, 2012
  • Virginia Pine

    This is one of the few species of evergreens that thrives in warmer winter temperatures, so it's a popular Christmas tree for Southerners. It holds its needles well, and has well-spaced branches for hanging ornaments.

    Date Published: November 16, 2012
    Date Updated: November 16, 2012
  • Grand Fir

    The bicolor needles on this majestic tree are deep green on top and white streiped underneath. Since this tree grows well in climates with long winters and cool summers, it's most likely to be found on Northern tree farms.

    Date Published: November 16, 2012
    Date Updated: November 16, 2012
  • Eastern Red Cedar

    This tree is native to the eastern half of North America. Its old-fashioned appeal and pungent fragrance make it a wonderful Christmas tree.

    Date Published: November 16, 2012
    Date Updated: November 16, 2012
  • Balsam Fir

    This is an excellent choice for a Christmas tree, thanks to its wonderful woodsy scent, dark green needles, and purplish-blue cones.

    Date Published: November 16, 2012
    Date Updated: November 16, 2012

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