11 ways to support tomato vines | Living the Country Life
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11 ways to support tomato vines

Your growing tomato plants need plenty of support. Keep them off the ground with these creative and attractive options.
  • Same old, same old

     

    Galvanized wire tomato cages are fine when plants are small, but since sone vines can grow to 6 feet or longer, these cages may not be large or sturdy enough to support bigger plants laden with heavy fruit. We have compiled some great alternatives for supporting your tomatoes.
    Date Published: May 4, 2012
    Date Updated: March 22, 2013
  • A concrete solution

    Heavy-gauge concrete reinforcing wire can be formed into a cylinder to make a super strong tomato cage. Use sections about 5 feet long and bend them to make a cage about 18 inchess across. Wire the ends together and stake the cages into the ground. One nice thing about this type of cage is that the wide openings between wire make it easy to reach through and pick tomatoes.

    Date Published: May 4, 2012
    Date Updated: March 22, 2013
  • Artistic flair

    Spiral tomato stakes make a beautiful addition to your garden. You can use them alone, or in the center of a wire cage to support the stem. Wind the main stem around the rings of the spiral and loosely secure it every so often with a loose garden tie or strip of cloth.

    Date Published: May 4, 2012
    Date Updated: March 22, 2013
  • Wrap it up

    Turn your tomato cage into a mini greenhouse by wrapping the outside with clear plastic. This cage is made from wire rabbit fencing. The plastic will give your tomatoes a boost during cool weather. Once it warms up for good, remove the plastic to improve airflow and reduce disease risks.

    Date Published: May 4, 2012
    Date Updated: March 22, 2013
  • Climbing the ladder

    These ladder-like cages were built from 1x2" boards, but you could use old ladders if you have them lying around. Use rot-resistant wood when building your own cages. Cut crosspieces all the same length, from 14 to 18 inches, and the upright pieces 4 to 5 feet long. Leave space at the bottom of the upright pieces so you can push them a foot or so into the soil to keep the towers and tomatoes from toppling in the wind.

    Date Published: May 4, 2012
    Date Updated: March 22, 2013
  • Try a tepee

    Tepee towers are easy to construct from 2" to 3" diameter saplings, sticks, or bamboo poles. These use four poles in the outer frame and one in the center for extra support of the stem. Use cross-pieces for extra stability. Push the poles into the ground, and secure the top with wire or twine.

    Date Published: May 4, 2012
    Date Updated: March 22, 2013
  • Simply staked

    Drive a single wooden stake into the ground next to your plant, and attach the stem loosely with twist ties or fabric ties. As the plant grows taller, add more ties.

    Date Published: May 4, 2012
    Date Updated: March 22, 2013
  • Fence fix

    Sturdy chain link fencing makes a great support for tomato vines. Weave stems through the openings in the fence when plants are young, and soon they'll begin winding their own way upward. Use an existing fence, or build a row of fence right in your garden for your tomatoes.

    Date Published: May 4, 2012
    Date Updated: March 22, 2013
  • Sky-high

    This stylish tomato trellis is made of wood, with ten angled arms extending upward from a central support post. It looks like an old aerial television antenna. If you can find an actual antenna, go ahead and use it!

    Date Published: May 4, 2012
    Date Updated: March 22, 2013
  • Leaning tower of tomatoes

    Surround mesh-wire panels with wood or metal to create frames, and lean them against each other in the garden. Stake them at the base, and wire the tops together. Plant a tomato vine at the base of each panel. At the end of the season, the panels store flat.

    Date Published: May 4, 2012
    Date Updated: March 22, 2013
  • String them up

    A twine trellis works well in cases like this, where the tomatoes are planted in a brick raised-bed planter next to a porch. Simply pound a wood stake into the ground next to each plant and insert a screw eye into the end. Insert another screw eye directly overhead into a beam or soffit. Stretch the string tightly between the two and tie. Use additional twine to loosely attach the stems to the trellis as the plants grow.

    Date Published: May 4, 2012
    Date Updated: March 22, 2013
  • Fancy plants

    You can find decorative cone-shaped obelisks at your local garden center. They're most often used for climbing flower vines like clematis and morning glories, but they also work well for tomato vines.

    Date Published: May 4, 2012
    Date Updated: March 22, 2013
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