How to make money selling scrap metal | Living the Country Life
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How to make money selling scrap metal

Selling junk metal can leave you with a cleaner acreage and a fatter wallet!
  • De-junk your place

    Getting rid of junk on your property can be a big job, whether or not you actually put it there. Some new acreage owners are faced with items like junk cars, dilapidated sheds, old appliances, or even piles of debris left by the previous owners. Before you throw everything into a construction dumpster or hire someone to haul it to the dump, consider pulling out the metal. You could make a little money while cleaning up your property.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 3, 2012
  • DIY or hire it done?

    If you have a pickup truck or trailer that can be used to haul metal to a scrap yard, you can certainly do this job yourself. If you don't have the equipment, the time, or the inclination for larger jobs, however, you can still make a little money on your scrap metal. Consider striking a deal with a local farmer, or even a teenager looking for work. You can load items together or have them do it, let them haul it away, then split the profit. Make sure to get an agreement in writing beforehand.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 3, 2012
  • Finding a scrap yard

    You can do an Internet search to find scrap yards near you, but the best way to find out where to take your scrap is to ask your neighbors. Once you have a list of scrap yards, call them to find out what prices they are offering. These prices change from day to day, so it’s worth making a few phone calls each time you have a load to sell. Also, not all scrap yards accept all kinds of metal, so ask before you haul your items to them.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 3, 2012
  • What kind of metal can be sold?

    <UL><LI>Copper wire from old appliances and home remodeling jobs, copper pipes and copper components of car engine parts can be sold. Remove the plastic coating first and cut tubing into 2-foot lengths.</LI>
    <LI>Aluminum siding, old screen doors, cans, aluminum boats, and even old radiators can be sold as scrap metal.</LI>
    </UL>

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 3, 2012
  • More types of metal

    <UL><LI>Cast iron and steel items like car engine parts, car bodies, and old appliances can be sold. Remove Freon from refrigerators and air conditioners, and separate copper wire or other metals from appliances.</LI>
    <LI>Old farm equipment, tin roofing from old sheds, and other metal objects found lying around can also be sold. You may need to use tin snips to cut roofing in to manageable sections, and take equipment apart if you don't have a way to haul it in one piece.</LI></UL>

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 3, 2012
  • Other items for the scrap wagon

    You can scrap old bicycles, golf clubs, hot water heaters, boilers, furnaces, air conditioners, dehumidifiers, lawn mowers, chainsaws, snowblowers, barrels, grain bin sections, gutters, ladders, microwaves, cast iron bathtubs, awnings, exercise equipment, fencing, wire, lawn furniture, ovens, pots and pans, rebar, sinks, cabinets, tanks, bbq grills, chicken wire, and more!

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 3, 2012
  • Electronic trash

    It can be hard to get rid of old computer units and cell phones, and many places will charge a recycling fee. Some scrap yards will buy these items, since they may contain gold-plated pins and other parts which can be sold or recycled. You'll still likely have to pay your trash collector to take your old monitors and televisions off your hands. If they still work, you may be able to donate them to charity.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 3, 2012
  • Determining what you have

    There are two basic types of metal. Ferrous metals like steel, iron, and tin are magnetic. Non-ferrous metals like copper and aluminum are not. Non-ferrous metals are worth more at the scrap yard. Carry a small magnet with you to help sort your metals.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 3, 2012
  • Keep 'em separated

    Separating metals is the key to making the most possible money at the scrap yard. Remove anything non-metal like wood, plastic, or glass. Make sure all liquids are drained and properly disposed of. Disassemble items if necessary to keep different types of metal separate. For example, your aluminum door may be held together with steel screws, or a certain car part may be comprised of both aluminum and steel. Separating is the only way to get a higher price for the higher value metals.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 3, 2012
  • Preparing your scrap metal

    Different recyclers have different requirements, so it's important to check with them first. For example, they may accept old fire extinguishers, but they must have holes punched in them. Or they may take old lawn mowers or weed eaters, but the gas must be drained from them. You may need to remove all of the glass from metal doors before selling them. Junk cars will need to have all non-metal parts (like seats, hoses, etc.) removed. If there are any salvageable parts on the car, you may be able to make more money selling those parts individually rather than for scrap.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 3, 2012
  • Selling your scrap

    Recycling centers or scrap yards buy metal based on weight, and you will be paid by the pound. Many facilities will have a truck scale, so you can pull your loaded pickup or trailer onto the scale to have it weighed. Once the metal is unloaded, it is weighed again to determine the weight of the metal. Depending on the type of metal and how clean it is, you can expect to make anywhere from a few cents to a few dollars per pound. The money is a nice bonus, but living on a junk-free acreage is the real reward!

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: May 3, 2012
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