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Pond aerators

There are few things more unsightly than a stagnant pond, overgrown with algae and producing an awful odor. What's more, a stagnant pond creates an unsuitable environment for producing healthy fish. And when fish aren't present, a pond becomes an excellent breeding ground for those pesky mosquitoes.
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Three types of aerators

Pond aeration not only provides a pretty aesthetic to your pond but also keeps the water clean and clear of any stagnation and foul odors. An aerator like the Kasco Marine model pictured above will circulate water throughout the pond, which, in turn, distributes oxygen necessary for a healthy pond.
There are few things more unsightly than a stagnant pond, overgrown with algae and producing an awful odor. What's more, a stagnant pond creates an unsuitable environment for producing healthy fish. And when fish aren't present, a pond becomes an excellent breeding ground for those pesky mosquitoes.
There is hope, however. The best way to ensure you'll get clean, healthy water is with the use of a pond aerator.
Surface aerators are typically used as fountains and create a decorative display. They splash the surface of the pond to help control surface algae; however, they do not aerate the bottom of deep ponds. While their displays are appealing, they may not work for you if deep aeration is your goal.
Diffused aerators use a shore-mounted compressor to pump air through hoses that are attached to diffusers at the bottom of the pond. This system achieves total aeration regardless of the water depth. Diffusers produce thousands of tiny bubbles that rise to the surface, circulating healthy oxygen throughout the water.
Windmill aerators harness the wind to oxygenate the water and are ideally suited for areas needing aeration without electricity nearby. The wind passes through hoses that are connected to diffusers at the bottom of the pond, which push oxygen out. Though they can be placed hundreds of feet away from the water's edge, some locations may still have trouble catching the wind.

Date Published: April 13, 2012
Date Updated: July 20, 2012

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