Top 10 Compact Tractor Attachments | Living the Country Life
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Top 10 Compact Tractor Attachments

The right attachments for your compact tractor can make tasks easier and faster.
  • Compact tractors are the perfect machines

    Machines for helping you get chores done around your acreage. With the right attachments, your tractor can increase its versatility and save you time - and your back. Whether you're looking for implements to improve your landscaping, to lift heavy objects, or to clear that winter snow from your driveway, there's an attachment for you. On the following pages are 10 must-have compact tractor implements.
    <br>Pictured: A rotary cutter is the perfect tool this spring if you have large grassy areas on your place. Just hook the implement up, and you'll have the area cleared in no time.<br>

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Quick-hitch systems

    Connecting an attachment to your tractor can be a hassle, especially if you're switching implements often. Avoid this inconvenience with a quick-hitch system. Just attach the device to your tractor's three-point hitch, back up to the attachment, lift up, and you're ready to go. You will need to manually attach the implement to the PTO shaft if it's used. <br>There are two main types of three-point quick-hitch systems: ASAE standard and the international standard delta-shaped hitch. ASAE hitches are the cheaper option, costing around $200; however, many attachment manufacturers don't follow the ASAE standard. You will need to make sure each of your implements meets the size requirement. <br>The delta-shaped quick hitch is adjustable and works with almost every tractor attachment. Delta-shaped hitches have two parts: one for the tractor and one for the implement. To avoid the hassle of always switching the implement hitch, you'll most likely want to buy one for each attachment. The tractor hitch costs $300; each implement hitch costs from $150 to over $300. <br>

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Front-End Loader

    Hauling gravel, hay, and other heavy loads is a breeze with a good front-end loader. With the latest designs al-lowing a clearer view during operation, you will be able to get your loader closer to objects than ever before. A loader is highly versatile; it can do much more than scoop and carry objects. Use it to haul water, to grade your driveway, and to do many other tasks. Bucket selection is an important part of utilizing your loader to its best advantage. For light loads, opt for a light material bucket; when hauling heavy materials, upgrade to a heavy-duty bucket. Depending on size and quality, a loader attachment will cost between $2,000 and $5,500. Before buying, make sure your tractor has the correct hydraulic system for a loader.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Rear Finishing Mower

    If you have a large yard, a finishing mower is a good attachment to own. The mower's three-blade system and adjustable cutting height will give your yard a smooth, even finish. Finishing mowers are able to adjust to the contours of the land with a floating deck, reducing scalping and undercutting incidents in low and high spots. Because they can be hard to maneuver around tight angles, finishing mowers work best in large open areas. The mowers are not designed to cut thick weeds or brush. Some manufacturers offer additional mulching and anti-scalping kits for the decks. Finishing mowers range in size from 4 to 6 feet. Mowers are available in a range of prices - from $1,300 to over $3,000. The best models have four-gauge wheels, a heavy deck, and separate belts for the outer blades, which reduces belt wear.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Rear Blade

    A rear blade is a great tool for driveway grading, planting preparation, and snow removal. If you're looking to purchase a blade, select one that is about the same width as your tractor. Blades generally range from 5 to 8 feet wide. If the blade is too wide, your tractor might not have enough power to operate it; if it's too narrow, the blade will not be as efficient. The more adjustable the blade is, the higher the price. The most economic blades allow vertical axis adjustments only. More expensive blades have vertical and horizontal axis rotation, allowing you to lower the blade to one side or the other. Before purchasing, make sure to check that the blade is strong enough to hold up to the tasks you'll be using it for. Choose a blade that stalls or stops the tractor if it strikes an object that might cause it to bend. Rear blades generally cost between $400 and $800.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Rotary Cutter

    If you have large areas of brush and overgrown grass on your farm, a rotary cutter is a must. Cutters are designed for heavy-duty mowing and can cut brush up to 2 inches in diameter. Be aware that a rotary cutter is not a lawn mower substitute. Although some cutters can be set to lower cutting heights, the implement is designed to cut grass no shorter than 3 inches. Most cutters are not able to adjust to small changes in the land's relief; too low of a cutting height may result in the cutter scraping the soil. Many manufacturers have designed cutters that reduce the amount of objects thrown. However, reduction does not mean elimination; objects can be thrown several hundred feet and cause serious injury. Cutters should be operated with extra caution and outfitted with chain guards. Cutters range in size from 4 to 7 feet wide and costs range from $1,000 to $1,850.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Backhoe

    When your needs demand a hole deeper and bigger than your shovel can accomplish, a compact backhoe is just what you need. Backhoes vary in performance level depending on the size, horsepower, and hydraulics of your compact tractor. The larger and deeper the hole, the more horsepower and hydraulics you'll need on the tractor. Digging depths range from 6 to 9 feet. Bucket selection is key to getting the most out of your backhoe. Buckets are often interchangeable, so it may be worthwhile to buy more than one size. While new two-lever operator controls make operation easier than four-lever systems, backhoes can be tricky to operate until you develop skill. Be sure you're willing to put the time and effort into this machine before buying. Backhoe prices range from $5,000 to $12,000 with one bucket. Extra buckets cost several hundred dollars each.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Spreader

    Spreaders can be useful for lawn seeding, fertilizing your garden, and spreading salt during the winter. You have a choice of two types of spreaders: rotary and pendulum action. Pendulum-action spreaders have a symmetric distribution pattern no matter what material you're spreading, although you will need to adjust the swath width from material to material. Add a shorter spout or a splitter box to your pendulum-action spreader, and you're ready to apply fertilizer bands. Rotary spreaders require the operator to adjust the pattern settings depending on the material being spread. You can perform pattern tests to determine the ideal pattern settings and swath widths, but a rotary spreader will rarely have a completely symmetrical distribution. Product packaging sometimes lists recommended pattern settings. Spreaders range in price from $270 to $900.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Rotary Tiller

    Whether you're looking to control the weeds in your large garden or get your landscape ready for planting, a rotary tiller will help you accomplish your tilling tasks. Before selecting a tiller, first determine the capabilities of your tractor. In general, every foot of width on a tiller requires at least 10 hp. Most tillers are 3 to 5 feet wide. If your tractor is on the small side, you may have to buy a smaller tiller that will be set off to one side or the other. The main way of controlling the extent of the tillage is your speed. The slower you move the tiller, the more it breaks up the ground; a speedier pace results in rougher soil. Skid shoes control tilling depth and can be adjusted from around 1 inch to several inches deep, depending on the model. Most rotary tillers have a tailgate flap on the back. The average price of a rotary cutter is $1,700.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Box Scraper

    Box scrapers are great for leveling, scraping, and breaking up even the hardest ground. With blades on both sides of the box, box scrapers can be used in a forward or backward position depending on whether you want to pull or push material. Ripper teeth on the front of the box loosen compact soil, and then the blade follows, scraping and smoothing the ground. Box scrapers are great for driveway maintenance; as you drag your scraper behind your tractor, it moves gravel from high elevation areas and redistributes it to low spots. If you are looking for a snow-removal device, an open blade is best; box scrapers tend to fill with snow quickly. A box scraper's width should match the width of your tractor's tires to get the most out of your attachment. A blade that's too wide could overpower your tractor. Most scrapers are 5 to 6 feet wide and cost between $500 and $750.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Snowblower

    When Mother Nature drops several inches of snow, a snowblower attachment can make clearing your driveway easier and faster. For deep snow, some manufacturers have developed a blower that can sense if its auger is be-coming plugged. The blower will then slow down the auger while maintaining the speed of the fan until it clears the buildup. Several brands also have manual chute rotators or hydraulic height and rotation-adjusting systems, which allow you to adjust the direction the snow is blown without leaving your seat. Snowblowers are available as rear and front attachments. A front-attach blower connects to a mounting system; a rear-attach blower hooks up to a tractor's three-point hitch. Depending on whether the blower is front attached or rear attached, cutting widths range from 50 to over 80 inches. Snowblower prices range from $2,500 to over $8,000.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
  • Posthole Digger

    Whether you're fencing property or planting trees, posthole diggers make digging easy. Augers are usually sold separately, giving you the freedom to choose as many or as few sizes as you need. Ideal auger sizes for compact tractors range from 4 to 12 inches. Digging depths range up to about 40 inches, although some manufacturers offer extensions, allowing you to go even deeper. Diggers work effectively in most soil conditions, but for extremely hard soil, you may want to opt for a heavy-duty digger. Pressure kits for extra digging oomph are also available. If you plan to use your digger for planting trees and shrubs, be aware that an auger compacts the soil as it digs. To ensure that roots will be able to penetrate the soil, take a spade and loosen the soil on the sides of the hole before planting. Posthole diggers cost an average of $650. Larger heavy-duty diggers can cost over $1,000.

    Date Published: April 13, 2012
    Date Updated: April 30, 2012
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