Living the Country Life
More
Close

Alfalfa Content

Story
Without sulfur, plants tend to appear yellow and stunted
Alfalfa needs sulfur to grow. Before the 1990s, the source of sulfur came from acid rain. When environmental regulations kicked in, the sulfur supply began disappearing. This means hay producers now...
Blog Post
Bob cut the alfalfa on the last day of May. It was way past full bloom and weedy, but a wet spring left him no choice in timing. In fact, the weather forcast is now calling for storms tomorrow,...
Slideshow
All-new Kubota Hay Tools hit dealerships for spring 2014.
Story
Dave Holt developed a healthy alternative to chewing tobacco out of alfalfa
Cowboys have chewed smokeless tobacco for generations. For over 40-years, Dave Holt of Whitehall, Montana, almost always had a pinch in his lip when he was roping calves. A few years ago a dentist...
Story
Good feeding practices are the key to prevention
Botulism is caused by toxins produced by a bacterium in low-or-no-oxygen environments, and can be deadly to horses. They usually ingest the toxins in their feedstuffs. Eating trampled hay, or hay...
Story
If alfalfa isn't drawing enough boron from the soil you might see reduced yields
Alfalfa plants need boron for optimal growth and production. In soils, the nutrient is released from organic matter. If the surface dries out, plants are unable to feed in the zone where most of the...
Blog Post
Somehow, in the worst drought for our part of Iowa in 50 years, Bob made five cuttings of alfalfa. The last bales went in the barn after dark last night. Each cutting got smaller and smaller as the...
Slideshow
Like with any job, you need the right tools to make hay.
Story
An insect infestation in your alfalfa field sends your yield and economic value downhill. Learn how to properly identify the insects and control them for the best outcome. Radio interview source:...
Story
Living the Country Life Radio Program with Betsy Freese
Test before you plant Listen to this radio show (MP3 download) or read below. Radio interview source: Stephen Barnhart, professor of agronomy, Iowa State University We usually get four cuttings...