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Cows that ingest sharp metal objects are at risk of developing hardware disease
Cattle aren't picky eaters, they'll even swallow small pieces of metal. Sharp objects aren't good for the abdomen. Grant Dewell is a beef extension veterinarian at Iowa State...
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Meet some of the cattle, dogs, chickens, and other animals our readers adore. These photos were shared in our online gallery and on our Facebook page.
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They aren't miniature cows; they're full beef animals, only smaller.
American Lowline cattle are a great fit for a small acreage owner who wants to raise beef but doesn't have a lot of space. Lowlines are related to the Angus breed but more compact, with shorter...
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The sick Red Angus calf says it all. It's been a rough spring for cattle -- long, cold, and wet. She ended up in the vet clinic "hot box" last night with an IV. Bob says this has...
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Selecting the right animal increases your odds of getting the blue ribbon
Showing beef cattle is a popular project for kids in 4-H and FFA. David Kirkpatrick is a beef extension specialist at the University of Tennessee. He says when you're choosing a steer, the number...
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At the Purina Animal Nutrition Center, animal experts feed more than 3,000 animals on a 1,200-acre working farm every day. Here are some helpful tips they’ve learned over the last 85 years.
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Beef producers should be on the lookout for lice infestations and have a plan for controlling the spread to prevent animal stress
Lice is a noticeable problem in cold weather when cattle have heavy winter hair coats, says Ron Lemenager, Purdue Extension beef specialist. "That's the perfect scenario for lice populations...
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A cow that's healthy and productive adds value to the herd
Radio interview source: Dr. Jane Parish, Extension Beef Cattle Specialist, Mississippi State University Listen here to the radio story (mp3) or read below If you have a "cash cow...
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Cattle temperament influences how animals should be handled, how they perform, and how they respond to disease.
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and university scientists have found that cattle temperament influences how animals should be handled, how they perform and how they respond to disease. The...
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Quick Tips Brought to You by Purina Animal Nutrition LLC
We all know hydration is vital and your cattle depend on you for their hydration.  Water management should be included in your nutrition plan; here are some tips that will ensure your herd...

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