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Look at the clouds to get an idea of what the weather will be like in the near future
Clouds are classified by their height and appearance from the ground. Fortunately most clouds are harmless, and they can help you decipher what the weather is doing. Brenda Brock is the Chief...
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Here are steps you can take to beat the heat.
Things we already don’t like about summer, like bugs and extreme heat, are only going to get worse, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). The Council released a tip...
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You can’t do much about the weather, but you can protect your soil
There’s little doubt that the weather has been extreme all over the country the past few years, making it tough on farmers. Flooding erodes away valuable topsoil and nutrients, and drought...
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Tornadoes can strike with little warning, so know where you can take shelter quickly
The best place to be in threatening weather is underground, so if there's a warning in your area,  go to the basement. If you don't have a basement, there are options for building a...
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Be ready for any foul weather that might come your way
Spring storms are on their way. Molly Hall, executive director of the Safe Electricity program, provides these tips to stay safe.   Assemble necessary supplies for a potential outage. Your...
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Bob and I flew to Maryland last week to spend time with family and friends. Hurricane Sandy showed up while we there, but she didn't ruin the party. Mom and Dad's old farmhouse started to...
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You don't have to be a meteorologist to predict what the weather is going to do. There are signs to look for in the sky and on the ground that might help plan your day.
Radio interview source: Brenda Brock, Chief Meterologist, National Weather Service, Des Moines, IA Listen here to the radio story (mp3) or read below   Seeing fog or...
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Indiana corn is too far gone, and feed and forage for livestock will be short
Indiana crop conditions continue to deteriorate daily as the drought worsens to a level not seen since 1988, says Purdue Extension corn specialist Bob Nielsen. As of July 1, 2012 more than 90 percent...
Blog Post
It's 100 degrees, so Bob cut the alfalfa and says we are baling hay. He's going in the top of the barn, not me. I'm not sure how our sheep survive this prolonged period of hot and humid...
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Thousands of volunteers assist the National Weather Service on a daily basis.
Radar tells us many things about the weather, but it can't beat human observation. Having a rain gauge on your property allows you to know exactly how much fell at your place, despite what...

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